dognsuitcaseThink About Your Pets

Before you make the decision to move your pet to your new country, several factors have to be considered. First, will your pet be allowed in the destination country? If so, a health or rabies certificate from your veterinarian will most likely be required. Know how long the certificate will be considered valid and if your pet will need an entry permit for the country.

Age and breed are factors that will impact whether or not you take your pet abroad. Discuss it with your veterinarian and consider the age, temperament and breeding. Most countries require some time in quarantine, which can last anywhere from a few weeks to one year. Check with your consulate to learn the details about quarantine and vaccinations.

 
moving terms

Glossary Terms for Household Goods Moving

If you are moving for the first time and you are beginning to look at pricing for shipping your stuff, you will notice there are plenty of relocation and moving terms out there. 

Includes terms referred to in your moving contract, rental agreements and packing supplies.

Becoming familiar with the moving terms glossary will help ease your relocation experience. It is stressful enough for most people.

Moreover, it will help you understand your contract and all additional documents you have to sign at the day of move.

The move managers at Cartwright Moving have put together a list of terms and their definitions. We have tried to sum up the most important moving terms in our Moving Terms Glossary.

checklistPreparing for your upcoming move with a Moving Checklist

Moving can be an especially stressful time. So many details to oversee, children and pets to appease, and the tension that comes with leaving family and friends, and the thought of starting your life over in a new community.

Most experts agree that moving ones home and belongings can be one of themost stressful times a person will experience.

But with the right kind of planning and care, you can make your move a lot less stressful.

One of the best ways to do that is to stay organized and use countdown checklists.

move-kids2

Helpful tips for Moving with Children

Moving is hard on all family members and sometimes it can be especially hard on children who may not understand why you are moving and don't want to leave their friends. Even if you are transplanting to a bigger house in a nicer neighborhood, adjusting is difficult.

Small children rely on predictability and their sense of security is closely tied to familiar faces, places and activities. Older children are likely to feel the social impact of a move most. They will miss old friends they have known and worry about making new ones. For pre-teens and teens, having to re-establish themselves in a new and possibly very different social environment can be a scary prospect.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to make the move easier on your kids. Try some of these tried-and-true methods, geared to different age groups:

Cartwright International

Below is general information regarding Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.

The booklet is written by Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

They have prepared this booklet, which your moving company is required to give to you, for several reasons. First, entrusting your possessions to another can be a stressful experience. The booklet explains to you what you have a right to expect from your mover and what you should do to help ensure your move is a smooth one.

box

When do you need Moving Insurance?

When it comes to protecting your valuables, there are some things you should know about protecting your goods during your move.

If something were to happen to your goods during the moving process, you should know what you can do to replace or fix your damaged or lost belongings. Standard insurance has limited coverage so most companies will suggest some type of moving insurance for most cross country moves or when moving overseas.

Here are some options available for you by your movers:

Below are online sources for those seeking to move overseas.

Online Forums

Here's a list of online forums; places where you can chat with others who are in the same situation as you and those who are already living in the country you're moving to. It's a great place to get the current news and advice from people who know.

 

  • Expat Forum: www.expatforum.comprovides a guide to moving abroad, including a guide to buying property, overseas jobs and forums.
  • Expat Exchange: www.expatexchange.com is another informative site with a very active forum for people on the move. It also lists advice for buying real estate, job hunting and moving tips.
  • Transitions Abroad offers a list of yahoo groups you can join, along with expat blogs and websites - it's worth a look.
  • Yahoo groups: This is usually the first place I go to when thinking about doing something new, whether it's a hobby or traveling or moving someplace new. You can join for free, sign up for the group you're interested in then receive daily postings in your email box. If you haven't signed onto yahoo groups, I highly recommend it.

 

Consular Information Sheets

Consular Information Sheets are produced and distributed by the U.S. Department of State. These information sheets outline the country, with details on current travel conditions, including any security issues, warnings, and advice.

To access the information, you can call the Office of Overseas Shipping Services at (202) 647-5225 and listen to a pre-taped recording. This is the most current information you'll receive on the country you're researching.

The information sheets are also available online at the U.S. Department of State's website. Here, you can also access the latest travel warnings, obtain brochures on issues such as health overseas, sending money and tips on international adoption. This is definitely a site worth checking out and should be on your list of places to start your research.

 

The following are important tips to prepare your vehicle for shipment:

  • Vehicles must be in operating condition. Call us if your vehicle is not in working order.

  • Each vehicle must be equipped with a working emergency brake and must either be licensed or qualified to be licensed for operation on public streets or highways.

  • An extra charge is required for non-functioning vehicles.

Wash Vehicle
All vehicles must have a clean exterior so that a vehicle survey may be conducted at the load port. Dirty vehicles will not be accepted.

Remove All Personal Belongings
The only items acceptable for shipment in your automobile are those tools and accessories normally attached to the vehicle, or permanently installed in the dash, doors, rear deck, or console. For example, if not bolted in, the following items should be removed:

  • auto protective covers/auto bras
  • auto roof racks if not factory installed
  • CD's
  • compact disc players and discs
  • decorative ornaments
  • equalizers
  • extra speakers
  • loose radios
  • portable telephones of any type
  • power boosters
  • radar scanners
  • tape players and tapes
  • theft alarm systems (if you choose to leave the car alarm in your vehicle, make sure that the system is disengaged prior to shipment)
  • truck tailgate nets

Gasoline
Please make sure your vehicle has 1/4 tank or less fuel.
Please let us know if you are shipping a vehicle powered by an alternative fuel -propane, electric, natural gas.

Antifreeze
Automobiles shipped between cold weather states, especially during the fall and winter months, should contain antifreeze. We are not responsible for providing this protection nor liable for damage resulting from low temperatures.

Propane tanks
Vehicles with propane tanks for auxiliary uses must be delivered for shipment with the propane tanks empty of any liquid or fumes. The empty tank must be tagged and certified as "gas free" by an authorized propane dealer or service company. We recommend that you verify the cost of emptying and certifying propane tanks. It may be less costly to purchase a new tank at your destination.

International Car Shipping Tips

If you are planning to ship a car overseas, here are some tips that can help you avoid some common scams.

Too many things can go wrong when shipping a car internationally – the vehicle can get stranded at the port due to incorrectly filed paperwork, seized by customs on either end, damaged or even taken into possession by a car shipping company via lien sale. There are many horror stories about shipping companies holding a customer’s vehicle hostage until outrageous storage charges are paid, container sitting at the port due to forwarder’s negligence or unpaid shipping charges etc.

Don’t let any of it happen to you. Don’t be a victim of car shipping scams! Hopefully, the few tips below will help you to find a small reliable car shipping company with a high safety record that is ready to do business with you.


Things to do before shipping a car internationally:

 

  • Verify if the car shipping company you are going to use is registered with DOT (for domestic auto transport). DOT website can be found here.
  • Confirm the car transporter has current cargo insurance, with minimum liability exceeding value of your car.
  • If shipping a car internationally, check with Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) if your car shipper is registered with FMC as a freight forwarder or non-vessel operating common carrier (NVOCC). Also verify if this particular car shipping company has a current bond and shipping license. If the company is not listed there, it means they cannot legally provide shipping services whatsoever and you should avoid using such companies.
  • Avoid using domestic car trucking companies for international car shipping. Many truckers will offer their customers a “package deal” that includes car transport and overseas car shipping as well. Frequently they would offer “savings” and “discount” through their preferred car shippers. You should avoid using such companies by all means – international car shipping is complex, and often customers, after paying the trucker for “the whole package”, end up paying extra fees to the actual car shipping company.
  • Before committing to shipping your car internationally with the car transporter of your choice, make sure to get the shipping quote in writing. Read the fine print – many car shippers will hide extra charges behind it. Make sure the quote includes the following: origin (shipper’s door or port), destination (consignee’s door, port or unloading warehouse). Also, typical car shipping quote must clearly outline services tendered – door pick up, delivery to a certain place (point of export, be it transporter’s warehouse, port or dock), marine shipping insurance, shrink-wrapping (boats), crating (motorcycles), loading, fumigation, container drayage, all necessary paperwork, customs clearance, export declaration, bill of lading, etc.
  • If possible, get a Shipping Contract drafted between you and the shipping company – it should include all of the above in a more formal way, on shipper’s letterhead, signed and dated by authorized person.
  • Ask if there will be someone (an agent, or customs broker) who could assist with customs clearance and unloading at the country of destination. Also, do your homework on customs duties and taxes that may be due at the country you are shipping the vehicle to.
  • Do an internet search for reviews on a particular shipping company. There are specific websites, such as www.Ripoffreport.comthat may be worth checking.
  • Make sure to dial the auto transporter’s telephone number found on the company’s website and talk to your customer service rep in person. If your calls are left unanswered, or you cannot get straight answers on shipping and arrival dates, transit times, specific requirements for shipping a vehicle overseas, you should probably look for another car shipping company.
  • Always use your common sense (i.e., beware of making payments in advance via Western Union or cash, sending important paperwork (titles, payment) via regular mail, etc)

Moving can be a stressful time. Moving overseas can multiply the stress ten-fold.

Here are some helpful tips that can reduce the stress.

 


RESEARCH

Research where you are moving to see the type of culture, climate, customs, currency and other important information. If possible visit the country before you make up your mind, don't rely on other people's impressions. Ask yourself if the new culture will really suit you (and your family).

BE PREPARED

Murphy's law: If it can go wrong - it will. Don't assume that you'll be able to find the perfect job or house immediately. If possible make sure you've got enough money to see you through the first couple of months at the very least (preferably longer). Start preparing as early as possible, just getting all the necessary paperwork in order can take a long time.
Make a checklist of everything you need to do!

CREATE A REALISTIC BUDGET

Good budgeting could be what makes the difference between a successful relocation and a disaster. Before you go, work out what everything is going to cost during those crucial first months when you're trying to find your feet in a foreign land.

CHECK YOUR BENEFITS

If your company has initiated your move, you may be eligible for relocation benefits.

HEALTHCARE

Make sure that the country you are moving to has adequate healthcare facilities and infrastructure to support you (and your family), especially if you suffer from a medical condition which requires treatment or medication.

YOUR CURRENT HOME

Think about what you want to do with your current home (e.g. sell it, lease it, leave it empty) and what kind of accommodation will be most suitable in your new country. If you don't know anyone in the new country who can help find accommodation, consider the services of a relocation agent.

EMPLOYMENT

Will you be looking for work in your new country? If so, consider starting your job hunt before you go. Will you be able to use your existing qualifications or will a period of retraining be necessary? If you're moving somewhere where they don't speak the same language as you then you should...

LEARN THE LANGUAGE

Few skills will have such a positive impact on your relocation experience as being able to speak, or at least understand, the local language. Getting to grips with the local lingo before you go is a great idea!

PAPERWORK

No matter how insignificant that old document at the back of the bottom drawer may seem now, take it with you, the chances are at some stage you'll have to show it to someone. Moving countries can be a bureaucratic nightmare at the best of times but if you come prepared with the necessary paperwork you stand the best chance of a stress free relocation. Things to think about include birth certificates, wedding certificates, educational certificates, medical certificates (including those for your pets!), etc.

NOTIFY OF NEW ADDRESS

Don't forget to inform everyone of your new address and when you're going (unless you don't want them to find you, of course Seriously though, saying goodbye to friends and family can be the hardest thing about leaving, be prepared for an emotional roller-coaster ride as the day of departure draws near.

YOUR POSSESSIONS

Will you be taking everything with you or leaving some items in storage (or even getting rid of them completely)? How will you move your belongings? Can you transport them yourself or do you need the services of a moving company? Set aside those things you need to take with you in person so they don't get packed accidentally (passports, tickets, etc.)

INSURANCE

Once you've decided what you're taking with you, insure it. If you haven't already arranged appropriate insurance (health/life/travel, etc.) for yourself and your family as well...DO SO!

FINANCES

You may need to open a new bank account in your new country - look for information on the one which suits you best. Do you need to close your current bank account? At the very least you'll need to tell your current bank that you're moving.

CREDIT CARDS

Credit card companies need to be informed you're moving. Also, will the credit cards you're taking with you be widely accepted?

DRIVING

Depending on where you're going and how long you're going to be there you may need to apply for a new driving license or even take a driving test. Will you take your car with you or buy/rent/lease one when you get to your destination country?

UTILITIES

Gas, electricity, cable companies and so on will need to be informed of your departure and contracts terminated where appropriate. Make arrangements for final meter readings and bill payments.

 

POST REDIRECTION

Having your mail redirected after you leave can prevent you from missing something important.

 

ELECTRIC DEVICES AND MOBILE PHONES

Check whether or not your TV, video, hair dryer, alarm clock etc will work in the new country. You may need to take out a new network subscription for a mobile phone (or buy a new one with a subscription) - watch out for roaming charges with your current phone if you use it.

EMAIL

If moving means you can't keep your current email address, consider a free web based email account you can access from anywhere.

Plan Ahead

Summer time is the busiest time of the year for movers. In addition, the beginning and end of each month are traditionally busier than mid-month, regardless of the season. If you are planning to move during one of the times, plan well in advance so your mover's schedule will fit yours.

Now it is time to contact the movers on your list. Inform them of your destination and the timing of your move. Ask movers to provide you with a written estimate, and have them explain the services listed in the estimate in detail. Carefully compare each estimate to see which company best suits your needs and budget.

Packing

Proper packing by a trained packer using specially designed cartons and materials is crucial to a good move. Schedule packing with the mover a day or two before the moving van is loaded. If you are packing yourself, it is never too soon to start. While packing yourself can save money, movers will not usually accept liability for damage to items packed by owners.

Be present when your goods are packed. An inventory of your goods will be made and it is important to resolve any disagreements prior to signing the inventory. Make sure all copies are legible and all items are numbered. Have valuable items listed separately. Some appliances may require servicing prior to the move. Your mover can schedule these services for you.

There are several options for insuring your goods. All household goods shipments move under limited liability. However, you may purchase additional liability coverage from your mover.

Planning Your Moving Day

Your mover may ask you to select several consecutive days during which your goods can be loaded and a second series of dates during which your goods can be delivered to your new home. A spread of days gives you and your mover the flexibility needed to keep your move on schedule. Remember that summer months are the busiest, and some movers offer lower prices between the months of October and April.

Moving Day

Be on hand when the movers arrive

Discuss the delivery arrangements fully with your mover.

Have beds stripped and ready to be packed.

Save your energy - let the moving crew disassemble goods.

Read the Bill of Lading before you sign it.

Tell your mover how to reach you at your destination.

Keep in contact with the mover's agent at your destination while you are in transit.

Delivery

Generally, your belongings will be transported in a van along with those of other families in the same general direction. This helps to keep your costs down. Delivery is made on any of the several consecutive days agreed upon before the move began. Make sure the mover knows how to contact you to schedule actual delivery. If you cannot be reached at destination, the mover may place your shipment in storage to avoid delaying other shipments. This can mean additional charges for storage and handling.

Upon delivery, check your goods for damage. Do not sign the inventory until you have inspected your furniture and the exterior of the cartons.

Claims

If any of your household goods are damaged or lost, report the facts promptly and in detail on the van driver's copy (original) of the inventory sheet before you sign it. If you notice damage after unpacking, a claim must be filed within nine months after delivery. However, it is to your advantage to report damage as soon as possible. The mover must acknowledge receipt of your claim within 30 days and must deny or make an offer within 120 days of receipt of your claim. When making a claim or considering a settlement offer, keep in mind the amount of liability that you declared on your shipment. For example, if the value declared on your shipment was $5,000, the mover's maximum liability for loss or damage to the articles in your shipment is $5,000. Claims for more than this amount will be declined because they are in excess of the mover's liability that you declared on your shipment.

 

 

Auto Shipping Scheduling

Schedule your auto shipping at least 4 weeks before you move, giving enough time to arrange for a car mover carrier to pick up your vehicle. Basically, the more advance time the better. If you are not available, please arrange an alternative authorized party such as neighbor, friend or relative you can trust to transfer the car to the car mover. Most automobile shippers offer door-to-door service. However, in many residential neighborhoods it may be difficult to drive in a large truck carrying your vehicle. Because of potential difficulty in getting the truck into your neighborhood, the car mover may ask you to meet them at a nearby local shopping center or garage for pick up of your vehicle. The same will apply for the delivery.

Auto Shipping Insurance

Make sure your car is adequately insured by the car mover for relocation. Upon pick-up, the driver will do a condition report (bill of lading) for any scratches or damages on the vehicle which should be signed by both parties. The same will occur upon delivery; make sure you check vehicle before signing. Reporting any damages or claims at a later time is not advisable.

Personal Items

Do not leave personal possessions of any kind in your car. Of course spare tires, car jacks, and other standard items that can be found in a trunk of a new car are not a problem. Make sure anything left in the car is tied down securely.

Auto Shipping Delivery

Make sure that if you or an authorized party is not available to receive your car, that it will be stored in a secure storage facility where you will be able to pick it up at a more convenient time. This may be subject to additional charges.

Specifics on Auto Transport

Auto Shipping Cost

When working with a Car Mover, confirm what the total cost of the shipping will be. As you obtain quotes from several car transport and auto shipping companies, be prepared to provide: \

origination/destination

approximate departure date

type of vehicle(s)

type of car transport service desired (e.g., door-to-door car transport vs. terminal-to-terminal)

special car mover or auto shipping requests (eg., deliver at a location other than your home vs. at your home)

Paying For Shipping Your Vehicle

While some car movers and auto shippers may not require payment in advance, others require a deposit, or full payment in advance. If a deposit is given, amount due is always required at time of delivery - oftentimes with a cashier's check or cash. If full payment is required prior to car transport or auto shipping service, consider using a credit card so that charges may be disputed if circumstances warrant such actions.

Make Sure You Are Properly Insured

Your vehicle should be insured against damage and theft by your car transport or auto shipping company. Ask for a copy of the car mover's insurance coverage. Find out how the car mover's insurance works with your own insurance in the event of damage during car transport. Additionally, find out if there is any kind of damage deductible and the amount. Everything pertaining to the car move should be in writing. Your own car insurance policy may cover your vehicle in transit; make sure to contact your insurance company to find out. It is advisable that you do not leave any personal items in your car when it is shipped; items left in the car may not be covered by your homeowner's insurance policy.

Get Dates - Pick Up and Delivery

Get the estimated pick-up and delivery dates and times from your car mover or auto shipping company. Make sure to get a 3 day guaranteed window for the pick-up and delivery dates of your car, as suggested earlier get everything in writing. Once pick-up is made, your car mover or auto shipping company should be able to provide you with a specific delivery date. If you require a specific date for pick-up, many car moving and auto shipping companies can accommodate you and store your car at a terminal for an additional charge.

Check Car Moving References

It is important to verify the good standing and valid licensing of any car moving company or auto shipping service. We urge you to contact your local Better Business Bureau as well as to verify that the shipper's license is valid and active with the appropriate transportation agency (such as the state or federal Department Of Transportation). Mover MAX does its best to make sure that we list only quality service providers. However, we cannot guarantee the quality of service of any car moving or auto shipping company. It is important that you take the time to check references and get all services agreed to by the company in writing.

Inspect Your Car Before Auto Shipping

It is advisable that in addition to receiving a condition report document from your car mover detailing any pre-existing damage to your car, that you take photographs of the car, date the photos, and attach them to the condition report provided by the car mover for your records. You must have a detailed description of the condition of your car prior to shipping. The condition report or other document used by the car mover should include: current mileage, pre-existing damage of any type including: glass, scratches, paint, dents, and so on. This report is important in case any disputes arise.

Vehicle Delivery Inspection and Acceptance

When your car is delivered, make sure to methodically inspect your car. Use the condition report given to you at pick up and go over all of the details. Look for damage not on the original report. Check for changes in mileage and check every part of your car carefully including the roof and under your car. Look for obvious damage or changes to the car's condition that may have occurred during the shipping. If there are any discrepancies, make sure to note them on the condition report you received on pick-up of the car, and have the driver sign the document. Please be advised that you should avoid accepting your vehicle at night or at a location that does not permit you easy access to inspecting all parts of your car. It is absolutely essential that you perform a thorough examination of your car as described above. Remember that once you have accepted your car, your signed documentation is what protects you. If problems arise, reputable car moving and auto shipping companies will work out disputes with you in an amicable fashion, but you must have documentation.

Unresolved Disputes with Moving Companies

Always try to work out your dispute with the car mover or auto shipping company first. They often work on a referral basis and are motivated to working out problems. However, if you feel you have reached a dead end or that you have not been treated reasonably, you have the option of filing complaints with multiple agencies (BBB, State and or Federal Department Of Transportation, Interstate Commerce Commission) as well as seeking legal counsel.

 

For those of you who have never moved a vehicle before, we have included a list of many of the common questions asked about the vehicle quote process and about shipping your vehicle.

 

Moving an aging parent is not something anyone wants to ever have to think about, let alone have to do. In most cases, you will have to take on many items of furniture that you and other family members either have to find a home for or bring into your own homes. Sometimes these items can have tremendous value, which can add even more pressure to this situation. As difficult as this process can be emotionally, we have put together a list of items that might alleviate some of the physical and mental stress of moving.

At ServiceMagic, we assume that you know what is best for your aging parent as far as housing, health care and the like. This list is only to expedite the moving process, and not help find elder care facilities.

This list is divided into two different types of moves for aging parents. One is for moving parents within the same area. The other is for moving parents into an entirely different area, thus making a substantial move.

Most Important Items

Moving Antiques: Hire professional movers for antiques. These items have been in your family for years. The older they are, the more they are worth, and the more difficult it is to take care of them during a move. Let the professionals handle this so that they can be insured, protected, and safe.

Storage: You might have to store much of your parent's furniture and belongings. This is a place where you don't want to choose just any storage facility. Make sure you are storing your parents' belongings in a place that specifically handles antiques or anything that you do not want to get damaged from being stored.

Ideas on Storage: It might be a better use of your time and space to move some of your own things into storage to make room for your parents' things. Your things are likely to be newer and have less nostalgic value, plus they will require less care and maintenance. Be careful though, having too many things that are fragile or delicate in your house might change the mood of your home, especially if you have young children.

Items for Any Move

Appraise Valuables: Standard insurance plans cover general possessions up to a certain dollar amount. In the case of most parents, it might have been years since the last appraisal. If your parent(s) have more expensive items like antiques and jewelry that you need to insure, now is the perfect time to have your parents' possessions appraised before you take them on the road.

Garage Sale: A garage sale is a smart way to reduce some of your possessions and maybe even make a little gas money for the move.

Thrift Store: Make a trip to a thrift store to give away what you couldn't sell. Remember to get receipts and write-off forms for the value of what was donated.

Locating Boxes: Bars and liquor stores always have the best boxes. Their boxes are designed to be able to hold large amounts of weight. However, if you have a friend or neighbor who has moved recently, ask them if you can take some boxes off their hands.

Local Accounts: Settle any accounts that your parent(s) have with local merchants.

Address Change: File a change of address form for who you are moving with the post office.

Update Address: Change address with any magazines, newspapers, memberships, etc. so that your parent can receive his or her mail in their new place.

Medical Records: Grab medical records if your parent(s) do not have already have them on file. Make copies while you have them and a file where they can be stored.

Transfer Prescriptions

Safety Deposit Box: Don't forget to withdraw any safety deposit boxes.

Find Home for Plants: Most plants cannot handle the extreme environments they are placed in during a move. If you really care about your plants, find them a good home.

Heavy Boxes: Sit all boxes of books and heavy stuff on the floor so that lighter boxes can go on top.

Stacking Breakables: Find a place on the floor for breakables so that they can't fall off of anything.

Notify Friends: Send neighbors and friends cards or an email telling them of your parent's' new address.

Utilities: Set up a time to shut off your utilities, phone, cable, etc.

Moving Your Parent a Short Distance

Moving Company/Rental Truck: Hire a moving company or reserve a rental truck first thing. These services can easily get booked up and leave you without much choice. The sooner the better.

Bank Accounts: If your parent will carry a functioning bank account, decide whether or not you need to close the current one and open a new one that is either close to where you are or where your parent is.

Double-Check: If you are renting a truck, call again to make sure that there will indeed be a truck reserved, just to be on the safe side.

Renting the Truck: There will be a walkaround by you and one of the rental company employees. You will be held accountable for any damage that is not written on this sheet. So be sure to note every little flaw.

Loading a Rental Truck: Pack the heavy stuff toward the front of the truck, i.e. the part of the truck closest to the cab. Washers and Dryers should go on first, followed by pianos, furniture, and anything big and heavy.

Truck Ramps: Often rental trucks have a pullout ramp for loading and unloading. This ramp is narrow and typically made of aluminum. Be careful that you don't fall off either side when carrying heavy objects. Also, these ramps can become very slick if they even get a little bit wet. Carpet scraps and rags are great to minimize slipping.

Gas up the Truck: Be sure to take the rental truck back with a full tank of gas, as they will charge you an extraordinary amount per gallon if they have to fill it.

Moving Your Parent a Long Distance

Moving Company/Rental Truck: Hire a moving company or reserve a rental truck first thing. These services can easily get booked up and leave you without much choice. The sooner the better.

Prepare Your Car for the Road: If you are using a professional mover, have your own vehicle serviced (oil change, rotate tires, etc.). Do this as early as you can in case the mechanics find something that will require you to come back for a second visit.

Double Check on Your Rentals: If you are renting a truck, call again to make sure that your truck will indeed be ready just to be on the safe side.

Road Trip Items: Make a list of things that you want to have in the car with you. Buy some of your own windshield wiper fluid, anti-freeze or coolant, and oil. This truck will be pulling a heavy load and it might need more than just gas to get there.

Rental Truck Emergency Kit: Buy some windshield wiper fluid, anti-freeze or coolant, and motor oil. This truck will be pulling a heavy load and it might need more than just gas to get there.

Buy a Lock: Buy a lock so that you can secure the back door to your truck.

Road Construction: Call/search the web to find out if there will be construction on the roads you will be traveling.

Always Double-Check: Double-check reservations at campgrounds, hotels, motels, Aunt Jane's just to be on the safe side.

Road Supplies: Make a list of things that you want to have in the car with you, either to eat, drink, or occupy your mind.

Road Trip Essentials: Many moving trucks are only equipped with the barest essentials, often without a tape deck or CD player, sometimes even without FM radio. Check your particular truck and decide if you can travel that far without some good tunes or talk radio. Buying a small radio might be a good investment.

Tip for Efficient Travel: If you are moving a parent yourself, pack foods that have high-water content like grapes, oranges, apples, etc. These foods will keep you hydrated so that you don't have to drink so many liquids. This will reduce the number of times you will have to stop for restroom breaks and will keep you on the road.

Renting the Truck: There will be a walkaround by you and one of the rental company employees. You will be held accountable for any damage that is not written on this sheet. So be sure to note every little flaw.

Loading a Rental Truck: Pack the heavy stuff toward the front of the truck, i.e. the part of the truck closest to the cab. Washers and Dryers should go on first, followed by pianos, furniture, and anything big and heavy.

Consider Unloading: If you can, pack such that what you want to come off first is put on last. Mainly items that will be going upstairs or toward the back of the house should be loaded last, so they can come off first.

Truck Ramps: Often rental trucks have a pullout ramp for loading and unloading. This ramp is narrow and typically made of aluminum. Be careful that you don't fall off either side when carrying heavy objects. Also, these ramps can become very slick if they even get a little bit wet. Carpet scraps and rags are great to minimize slipping.

Crowns in the Road: All roads are crowned in the middle so that water won't stand. This crown will feel severe in a big truck. Try to stack the driver's side of the truck with more of the heavy stuff so that the truck rides even.

Towing a Vehicle: If you are towing a vehicle behind your rental truck, make sure the trailer has a working tow package. This means that the brake lights, tail lights, blinkers, and trailer brakes are all in working order.

Parking Your Rental Truck: If you are traveling on multiple nights, make sure to park your truck smartly. Find a wall or a tree or some otherwise immovable place where you can back the truck right up close. This way, if someone happens to break into your truck, they won't be able to get many items out.

Lodging reservations: If you will be stopping in an area with many lodging choices, it is best to grab a room when you arrive to get the best price. But if you don't want to drive around looking for places, then reserve a room in advance. If you are camping in a state park, it is best to reserve a space before you leave.

Gas up the Truck: Be sure to take the rental truck back with a full tank of gas, as they will charge you an extraordinary amount per gallon if they have to fill it.

One Extra Day: It is a smart idea to compare the pricing difference if you kept the truck one extra day. People often underestimate how draining the whole moving process can be, and if you are hurrying all day so that you can return the truck by five, you will most likely make extra work on yourself by not moving the right things to the right room. Find out what it would be worth to you to be able to take breaks, work at a nice pace, and take the truck back the next day. It could be such a small amount that it will be worth it to pay for the extra time and have the option to be tired and work smartly.

 

 

Many people find their first jobs right after undergrad. Most move to a new city, find an apartment, and begin their working lives. While it's usually easy to find friends and family to help you move to college, often you are on our own when moving out. This is a big time in your life, a stressful one at that, and completing this list of things will alleviate the stress of this crazy time.

Moving Out of Your College Town

Moving Company/Rental Truck: Hire a moving company or reserve a rental truck first thing, especially in a college town. You and everybody else are looking for a truck to rent. Make sure you get one first.

Cleaning Your Apartment: With finals, graduation, your new job, and your lease running out, it will likely be the case that you will be packing all your things in a couple days, maybe even less. But don't neglect your apartment, dorm, or student housing. They will have no problems fining you for an unkempt apartment. While it is hard to fully clean a place you will never see again, it was part of the lease agreement, and there is no point throwing away good money when all you need to do is a couple hours of cleaning.

College Furniture: If you have furniture, consider how closely you are tied to it. You are a professional now, and it might be time to jettison that old college furniture. Also, it will be cheaper and easier to move to your new city without having to rent a bigger truck for all of your old furniture.

Carpet Cleaning: If your carpet is a mess, and it is up to you to make it right, hire a carpet cleaning service to remedy all the spills and stains in your carpet.

Light Bulbs: Remember to replace all the light bulbs that have burnt out. This is part of most leases, so be sure to do this.

Locating Boxes: If you are looking to locate some cheap boxes, bars and liquor stores always have the best ones. Because of the weight of what is going in their boxes is so heavy, they are built to be sturdy. So don't worry about books or other heavy objects breaking them.

*Most Important Thing* Find a sticker for your car that shows that you are an alum. This is a great way to meet people, and also might help if another alum spots you having car trouble.

Packing for the Road

Packing Bikes: Visit a bike shop for a box to pack your bike.

Heavy Boxes: Sit all boxes of books and heavy stuff on the floor so that lighter boxes can go on top.

Stacking Breakables: Find a place on the floor for breakables so that they can't fall off of anything.

Rental Truck Emergency Kit: Buy some windshield wiper fluid, anti-freeze or coolant, and motor oil. This truck will be pulling a heavy load and it might need more than just gas to get there.

Buy a Lock: Buy a lock so that you can secure the back door to your truck.

Road Supplies: Make a list of things that you want to have in the car with you, either to eat, drink, or occupy your mind.

Lodging Reservations: If you will be stopping in an area with many lodging choices, it is best to grab a room when you arrive to get the best price. But if you don't want to drive around looking for places, then reserve a room in advance. If you are camping in a state park, it is best to reserve a space before you leave.

Always Double-Check: Double-check reservations at campgrounds, hotels, motels, Aunt Jane's just to be on the safe side.

Road Trip Essentials: If you are renting a moving trucks, know that they are only equipped with the barest essentials, often without a tape deck or CD player, sometimes even without FM radio. Check your particular truck and decide if you can travel that far without some good tunes. Buying a small radio or MP3 player might be a good investment.

Consider Unloading: If you can, pack such that what you want to come off first is put on last. Mainly items that will be going upstairs or toward the back of the house should be loaded last, so they can come off first.

Towing a Vehicle: If you are towing a vehicle behind your rental truck, make sure the trailer has a working tow package. This means that the brake lights, tail lights, blinkers, and trailer brakes are all in working order.

Parking Your Rental Truck: If you are traveling on multiple nights, make sure to park your truck smartly. Find a wall or a tree or some otherwise immovable place where you can back the truck right up close. This way, if someone happens to break into your truck, they won't be able to get many items out.

Moving In: If you have items that will just go into storage in your new home, such as in the basement or in a closet, be sure to take these boxes straight there. Don't just drop off boxes right inside the door because it's easy. Take them where they need to go because you will end up stepping over them throughout moving day.

One Extra Day: It is a smart idea to compare the pricing difference if you kept the truck one extra day. People often underestimate how draining the whole moving process can be, and if you are hurrying all day so that you can return the truck by five, you will most likely make extra work on yourself by not moving the right things to the right room. Find out what it would be worth to you to be able to take breaks, work at a nice pace, and take the truck back the next day. It could be such a small amount that it will be worth it to pay for the extra time and have the option to be tired and work smartly.

Gas up the Truck: Be sure to take the rental truck back with a full tank of gas, as they will charge you an extraordinary amount per gallon if they have to fill it.

Odds & Ends

Thrift Store: Make a trip to a thrift store to give away clothes and shoes that you don?t wear anymore. Remember to get receipts and write-off forms for the value of what was donated.

Find Home for Plants: Most plants cannot handle the extreme environments they are placed in during a move. If you really care about your plants, find them a good home.

Shut Off Utilities: Set up a time to shut off your utilities, phone, cable, and internet.

Cell Phone: Have your cell phone number changed to the appropriate city.

Close Bank Accounts: If you bank with a national bank, it might be the case that you won't need to close down your current one. You can just change the account to your new city.

Dry Cleaning: Don't forget to pick up your dry cleaning.

Tip for Efficient Travel: If you are moving yourself, pack foods that have high-water content like grapes, oranges, apples, etc. These foods will keep you hydrated so that you don't have to drink so many liquids. This will reduce the number of times you will have to stop for restroom breaks and will keep you on the road.

Change of Address: File a change of address form with the post office. Also change your address with credit cards, memberships, magazines, netflix, etc. Cancel your newspaper subscription if you are moving out of the area.

Moving in

Reserve the Elevator: If you are moving into a high-rise apartment, reserve use of an elevator (where possible) so that you are not constantly waiting on each load.

Apartment Walk-Through: Make sure that you make note of all the problems in your apartment when you move in so that you aren't held accountable for them when you move out.

Moving Related Items

Set Up Utilities: Call to have your utilities turned on the day before you arrive at your new place. Don't forget cable and internet.

Appraisal of Current Needs: Before you even think about moving things that you don't even want anymore, consider if you have anything that needs to be replaced. Why move an old mattress when you could have a brand new one waiting in your new home? Think about other large items that will be difficult to transport and consider buying the item new in your new city.

Medical Records: Grab medical records from your school, if you have any.

Transfer Prescriptions

Open Bank Accounts: Some banks have a painless transfer of accounts, although with others it can be a complete mess. Be prepared for the mess, and be pleasantly surprised if one doesn't happen.

Return Library Books/Rented Videos: If you happen to leave town without taking care of this, you most likely will forget once you are in a new place. This is an annoying task, but not as annoying as the fine that will accrue if you don't take care of this before you go.

Prepare Your Car for the Road: Have your vehicle serviced (oil change, rotate tires, etc.). Do this as early as you can in case the mechanics find something that will require you to come back for a second visit.

No More Groceries: Don't go to the grocery store for anything other than essentials. The idea is to begin paring down your food supply so that you have less to move and less to throw away.

Music Scene: Search for the music scene in your new location to find out if there are concerts you want to see soon after you arrive.

*All the Things You Will Miss* Visit all the restaurants, parks, theaters, shops, and anything else that you will not have access to once you move. End your time in this town and on this campus on the best note possible. Do the things you enjoy.

 

 

 

Did you know that in many cases, your moving expenses are deductable from your federal income taxes? If you moved because of a change in your job location or because you started a new job, you may be able to claim this deduction, even if you don't itemize deductions.

You can deduct your moving expenses if your move is closely related to the start of work;  your new main job location is at least 50 miles farther from your former residence than your old main job location was; and if you move within a year of reporting to your new job.  For more information, visit this link.

For information about the $8,000 tax credit for first-time home buyers in the economic stimulus plan signed into law by President Obama, visit www.federalhousingtaxcredit.com.

 

 

If you moved due to a change in your job or business location, or because you started a new job or business, you may be able to deduct your moving expenses. To qualify for the moving expense deduction, you must satisfy two tests. Under the first test, the "distance test", your new job must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old job location was from your old home. If you had no previous workplace, your new job must be at least 50 miles from your old home.

The second test is the "time test". If you are an employee, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months right after you arrive in the general area of your new job. If you are self-employed, you must work full time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months after you arrive in the general area of your new work location. There are exceptions to the time test in case of death, disability and involuntary separation, among other things.

If you are a member of the armed forces and your move was due to a permanent change of station, you do not have to satisfy the "distance or time tests".

Moving expenses are figured on Form 3903 (PDF) and deducted as an adjustment to income on Form 1040 (PDF). You cannot deduct any moving expenses that were reimbursed by your employer.

For more information on deductible moving expenses, please refer to Publication 521, Moving Expenses.

 

 

You have rights and responsibilities for every move. At Allied, we want you to be acutely aware of these rights and responsibilities when we manage your move. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's consumer protection regulations dictate the rules regarding the interstate transportation of goods.

Moving Resources: Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities

We value our customers more than any other van line. That being said, we also value your belongings when they are in our hands. It is imperative that you are educated regarding your rights and responsibilities when entrusting Allied with your valued belongings.

Moving Education: Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities

At Allied, we want you to be fully educated on your rights and responsibilities when you move with us. We believe that the most successful moves happen when you are educated about many things, most importantly your rights and responsibilities. We have provided two links to review the FMCSA publications below. Please take the time to understand your rights and responsibilities when working with a professional mover like Allied.

 

 

 

Moving? There are some things you should know about protecting your goods during your move.

If something were to happen to your goods during the moving process, you should know what you can do to replace or fix your damaged or lost belongings.

Here are the options available for you by your movers:

Option A: Full Value Protection:

Under this option, which is not considered to be insurance, articles that are lost, damaged or destroyed will be (at the mover's option) either repaired, replaced with like items, or a cash settlement will be made for the cost of the repair, or for the current market replacement value. No depreciation applies to this option. The exact cost for full value protection, as well as the settlement amount, in case of a claim, is determined by the moving company.

However, under this option, movers can limit their liability for loss or damage to articles of extraordinary value, unless these articles are specifically listed on the shipping documents. An article of extraordinary value is any item whose value exceeds $100 per pound. Ask your mover for a complete explanation of this limitation before your move.

Option B: Released Value:

This is the least expensive protection option available and is not considered to be insurance and provides minimal protection. Under this option, the mover assumes liability for no more than 30 or 60 cents per pound, per article. Loss or damage claims are settled based on the weight of the article multiplied by 30-60 cents. For example, if a 10-pound stereo component, valued at $1000 were lost or destroyed, the mover would be liable for no more than $6.00 (10 pounds x $.60). There is no extra charge for this protection, but of course, it provides very minimal compensation.

Here is the option offered by your Homeowners insurance policy:

Most homeowners' insurance policies do not provide coverage for your household goods for moving purposes. However, you may check with your own insurance agent to see if your existing homeowner/renters' policy covers your goods while in transit. Often, you will find that your goods are covered against damages while the movers are in your home packing, but not while the goods are in the movers' possession.

To be sure that your goods are protected each step of the way, including if your belongings need to go into storage, you must purchase an actual moving insurance policy. MovingInsurance.com offers two main policy types:

Full Replacement Value - Valued Inventory—is offered for Interstate (moving from state to state), Intrastate (moving within the same state) and International shipments. It provides coverage based on an itemized and valued inventory prepared by the assured (the customer buying the policy) prior to the shipment date. Please note that the value assigned to the articles should be the cost of replacement at your new destination. Any settlement based on this type of coverage would be the lesser of repair costs or the amount declared on the valued inventory.

Example: You have purchased a sofa in 1999 for $400. The current replacement value to purchase a like/kind sofa is $900. You should list the sofa's value at $900. If you list the value at the $400 purchase price, and the sofa is damaged or destroyed during the move, you would be limited to a maximum repair or replacement settlement at the amount you declared on the high value inventory.

This option is the most comprehensive and is the best coverage available, as it does not reduce the settlement amount for depreciation or a co-insurance penalty. This completed inventory could also act as a base for your Homeowners' or Renters' insurance policy at the new location.

Full Replacement Value - Lump Sum—is offered for Interstate (from one state to another) and International shipments only. This option provides coverage based on the total declared value/lump sum of the shipment. To avoid being under insured, it is required you declare a value equal to at least $8.00 times the total weight of your shipment and that high value items be specifically declared and valued. In other words, if your shipment weighs 3,000 pounds, you need to insure it for a minimum of $24,000 and indicate the individual value of your high value items.

With this option, items valued at less than $500.00 per item do not need to be specifically declared and listed on the inventory list, however, to be sure that these items are covered, you MUST include their value in your total Declared Value.

 

 

 

 

If you want to get the best price possible when selling your home, it is very important to make sure that it is appealing to potential buyers. Fix-up the following areas for an easy, quick sale:

Repaint walls in rooms that have high visibility (kitchen, baths and living areas).

Choose a neutral paint color scheme.

Refinish wood floors.

Have carpet professionally cleaned or replaced with a neutral colored carpet.

Replace or repair loose cabinet hardware.

Fix leaks in ceilings and walls.

Put magazines in decorative baskets. Weed out those you don't need.

Keep bills and personal papers organized and out-of-sight.

Replace worn kitchen countertops with new, clean, neutral colored materials.

Replace worn or outdated vinyl flooring.

Clean ceramic tiles and re-grout if necessary.

Reduce the number of personal items and clutter (memorabilia, keepsakes, awards etc.) in each room, to make the house seem cleaner.

Keep children's toys organized and in one area.

Replace broken, dirty or outdated blinds and curtains.

Clean closets and put items in plastic storage containers.

Clean and organize basement.

Clean and organize attic and storage spaces.

Make sure all appliances are clean and in working order.

Replace all burned-out light bulbs.

Clean all light fixtures and ceiling fans.

 

 

We want to thank everyone at Cartwright for getting our things from Virginia to Tokyo, Japan. You all have been an absolute joy to work with over a period of several months. You actually returned phone calls, initiated steps along the way that needed to be taken. You are wonderful to work with and we are doing positive advertising for you every chance we get.

Connie and Jason K.


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